We Are Nashville, 1 year later after the floods.

1yr ago today Music City was devastated by floods. Today we stand tall, unbroken & rebuilt.

We Are Music City, We Are Nashville.

I can remember it like it was just yesterday, we had friends coming in from out of town.  Our friend Chuck and his son was coming down from Illinois to stay the night on their way back home to Georgia, his wife was driving up from Georgia and meeting them here at our house.  The rain started and it didn’t stop.  Chuck and his son made it early in the afternoon.  When they were on Interstate 24 just minutes from our house and the water started to rise.  The water was at the edge of the interstate and if they would have been on the interstate for 10 minutes longer there is a good chance they would have been 2 victims of the rising water.  This picture is Interstate 24 about 15 minutes from my house where Chuck and his son had just came through not even an hour before.

Meanwhile, his wife was coming up from Georgia.  She pulled over in a town just before our because 1. there was a tornado heading right for where she was driving and 2. she couldn’t take driving in the non stop white knuckle pouring down rain any longer.  B, Chuck and his son headed out to pick her up.  As soon as they left the house a tornado warning came for us.  I put the kids in the closet and hunkered down for about 10 minutes.  After we had the clear back came B and Chuck.  They couldn’t get out of the neighborhood.  Every entrance was flooded.  Chuck was on a mission to get to his wife.  B stayed here with me and the kids because of the weather and Chuck headed back out.  He made his way through the waters and made it to his wife.  I was relieved when they made it back.

The rest of the afternoon we sat in front of the tv and watched in awwe.  We couldn’t believe our eyes.  It just kept rising..and rising..and rising.  The pictures that were coming in were unbelievable.  There was moments of complete silence in our living room with the occasional gasp.  This was happening.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

B’s phone started to ring and it didn’t stop (he runs Sunbelt Rentals Pump and Power, Nashville Division).  B went into work mode over drive.  I didn’t see him for a week, his guy’s families didn’t see their husbands and fathers for weeks.  They worked day in and day out, delivering pumps, pumping water out of buildings downtown, and anything and everything they could do they did.  The hard work, sweat and probably some sleep deprived tears were appreciated everywhere by everyone.

Nashville was over shadowed during this time by the Gulf Oil Spill.  That was Ok.  We didn’t need it.  This city came together like no one had seen before.  We didn’t need the coverage, we didn’t need the help because the people of Nashville jumped into action.  People came together, immediately went out to help rescue their neighbors, even if those neighbors were towns away.  That day I fell in love with my city all over again and on a whole new level.  I was proud to call myself a Nashvillian.

Take a few minutes and watch this incredible video. The song is “When one of us Stands” written for the floods.

There was a great article that was written by Patton Fuqua titled We Are Nashville.  Here are a few quotes from the article.

“The national news coverage gave us 15 minutes, but went back to focusing on a failed car bomb and an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico”

“The Cumberland River crested at its highest level in over 80 years. Nashville had its highest rainfall totals since records began. People drowned. Billions of dollars in damage occurred. It is the single largest disaster to hit Middle Tennessee since the Civil War. And yet…no one knows about it.”

“But let’s look at the other side of the coin for a moment. A large part of the reason that we are being ignored is because of who we are. Think about that for just a second. Did you hear about looting? Did you hear about crime sprees? No…you didn’t. You heard about people pulling their neighbors off of rooftops. You saw a group of people trying to move two horses to higher ground. No…we didn’t loot. Our biggest warning was, “Don’t play in the floodwater.” When you think about it…that speaks a lot for our city. A large portion of why we were being ignored was that we weren’t doing anything to draw attention to ourselves. We were handling it on our own.”

Benefits, concerts and telethons quickly followed raising money to help the ones effected, the ones that lost everything in the flood.  I am very proud to say that I was able to be a part of one benefit.  My sister, myself and a few others came together and put together a benefit concert at 3rd and Lindsley, one of Nashville’s oldest music venues where my sister was working at the time.  We had music all night long, a silent auction, sold t-shirts that we had made and took donations with all the money going to The Community Foundation.  I am so proud to say that all of our hard work raised almost $3000.  It felt so good to do something that would help others.

The people of this city and all surrounding areas came together in the most beautiful way.  The floods didn’t discriminate in it’s attack.  Everyone from the common Joe to celebrities were effected by the waters and all came together to help one another.

After a year people are still rebuilding, still feeling the effects of the waters.  On this day 1 year later we are being hammered by rains again with our western counties in Middle Tennessee on the verge of being flooded again, some already are.  It makes the memories of what happened a year ago that much more vivid and some unfortunately are reliving it once more.  My heart goes out to them and everyone in this wonderful beautiful city which we call home.

I am proud to call this wonderful city my home.

I heart you Nashville.

We are Nashville, We Are Music City.


About Jamie

Taking my time through this A-Mazing thing called my life. I'm the owner and photographer at The Adore Girls here in Nashville TN. Life is what you make of it and I am making mine...AMAZING!

Posted on May 2, 2011, in life, Music, Nashville, We Are Nashville and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 14 Comments.

  1. firecracker3

    The whole point about the lack of action and issues and the link between that and the news coverage is very true. Good stories are nice, they are usually a great closing piece for the news but it doesn’t make the headlines. Problems, drama, etc do.

    I don’t think most people realize the magnitude of what occured and how far Nashville has come in 365 days compared to many other places hit with the force of Mother Nature.

    Great tribute post!

  2. Thanks! I agree, no one really understood how bad it was or even today for that matter.

  3. Great post!! This is probably why we hardly get international aid when a disaster hits our country-we handle it on our own!

    A big Kudos to the citizens of Nashville and the state of Tennessee! You are to be commended for coming together and over coming the odds! I salute you!

  4. Beautifully written post. What a devastation. Be proud of your city girl! I had no idea of the magnitude of the devastation. Nashville has come so far in such a short time.

    Thanks for sharing your personal story.

  5. Awesome Fnky!! Awesome!!
    Brilliantly written! I knew about it cause we had family leaving out there.
    Good job on standing up and being a leader!

  6. It didn’t even occur to me that you would have lived through that. It’s amazing and humbling to remember that Mother Nature can do. So glad you and your family are ok, but it’s good to remember the destruction. If it is out of sight, it is out of mind. We should remember.

  7. A disaster gets its day’s worth of headlines, and then the story switches somewhere else. People forget pretty quickly it will take years and years until things recover.

    • We didn’t even get that when this all started. We were overshadowed for a few days before anyone in the media realized the magnitude of the devastation. The city of Nashville just handled it and didn’t cry out for help or have the drama that would draw immediate attention. People are still recovering from it a year later and as I type some of the places that flooded are flooding again.

  8. Very nice post. I can’t believe you were a part of this – it must’ve been so damn scary!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: